Pulling Back the Curtain on some Chemical Magic

In order to drum up interest in chemistry, instructors at all levels perform demonstrations (or demos) of chemical reactions. The power of demonstrations has been used to lure the uninitiated since the 18th century. Think about it, what better way is there to get the attention of a sleepy 18 year old gen chem student than this:

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I’m a former chemistry assistant prof that is out to prove that chemistry is both interesting and entertaining

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I’m a former chemistry assistant prof that is out to prove that chemistry is both interesting and entertaining

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